Just In: Television Executives Move To Cancel Thursday Night Football

It seems as though the NFL National Anthem protests are coming to bite the NFL right in the butt. Self-entitled NFL players have decided that their “right to protest” is more important than following the rules of their contracts and respecting our country. Somehow these players have decided that kneeling during the National Anthem is getting a point across about “racial inequality” in America. It hardly seems appropriate for men who are making millions of dollars every year to be claiming injustice in our country. And, if they truly believe there is some sort of injustice, they should put their money where their mouths are and use some of their fortunes to help the less fortunate in our inner cities. Things aren’t looking so good for the NFL now.

Network executives have decided that something must be done in order to put an end to the rising tension between viewers and those participating in NFL protests. Executives are dealing with horrific ratings that keep plummeting. They have decided that there is only one real solution to the problem, and that is getting rid of the games in order to stop the “over-saturation” of football on American television. 

Executives have proposed their point that less NFL games may just be the solution to their problems. “Over-saturation” can be combatted by getting rid of ten games in the Thursday Night Football lineup. While it may sound like a strange solution to us, it might just work.

Sports Business Journal took the first step and decided to cut Thursday Night Football from eighteen games to just eight games. By eliminating ten games, their plan was to stop the ratings from crashing further.

Sports Business Journal reported, “Ten years ago, the NFL had 32 game windows through week six. This year, it is up to 39, a 22 percent increase. It’s even more crowded in college, where the 2007 windows to this point added up to 105. This year, it’s at 179, up a whopping 71 percent.”

Mike Mulvihill, the vice president of Fox Sports, stated that over-saturation is an issue, but not the only issue they are facing.

Mulvihill was quoted saying, “The rise in football availability is pretty dramatic. This is what drives fragmentation in every area of television. … You can argue whether there’s greater or lesser interest in the game of football than there was ten years ago. But clearly, whatever that interest is, it’s being spread out over quite a few more windows than it was ten years ago.”

Chairman of NBC Broadcasting and Sports, Mark Lazarus, stated that the biggest age group responsible for the ratings crashing is viewers between 18 and 34 years old. It’s time for television executives to figure this whole thing out before they lose even more business. We could care less what happens to these rich executives, but I’m sure they’re willing to do just about anything to save their own skin. Any player who disrespected the American flag and those who fight for our freedom should be ashamed and should apologize.

Cutting Thursday Night Football might be a good start, but it certainly isn’t the end all be all for this giant issue.

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